Radiology

Imaging Sciences are an extremely important part of St. Bernards healthcare. Most patients at St. Bernards are seen by the Radiology staff. The Radiologic Sciences are used in diagnosis and treatment and we are happy to be able to offer these radiology services to our patients. 

Radiology includes a variety of imaging modalities including: Ultrasound, Diagnostic X-Ray, CT, MRI, and Special Procedures.  Medical imaging is performed by licensed Radiologic Technologists. Our radiology department consists of Radiologists, a Radiology Assistant, Radiologic Technologists, and Registered Nurses.

St. Bernards provides Radiologic services to our patients at the Medical Center and the Imaging Center in Jonesboro, Arkansas.

Medical Center: (870) 207-4100

Diagnostic X-Ray

Two forms of radiographic images are in use in diagnostic x-ray: routine x-rays and fluoroscopy.

Routine x-rays are often used to determine the type and extent of a fracture as well as to detect pathologies. Routine x-rays are usually performed in the radiology department, but patients can also be imaged in their hospital rooms. If the patients’ condition deems them too ill to come to the radiology department some imaging can be performed using mobile units. The same is true for traumatic injury patients who are brought to the Emergency Room.  Mobile x-ray units are used to assist in making rapid diagnoses that allows for the best possible outcome for the patient.

Another facet of diagnostic x-ray is fluoroscopy that produces real-time images of internal structures of the body in a fashion similar to radiography. Contrast media, such as barium, iodine, and air are used to visualize internal organs. Fluoroscopy procedures include, but are not limited to: Lumbar Punctures, Spinal Myelograms, Arthrograms, imaging of the Digestive, Urinary, Vascular, and Reproductive Systems.

Diagnostic x-ray is also used in many surgical procedures. Radiographic C-arms produce images to assist surgeons during repairs or interventional procedures that take place in St. Bernards’ OR suites.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound is a safe and generally painless modality that uses sound waves to produce images of the inside of the body. Ultrasound imaging involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin to exam many of the body’s internal organs, including but not limited to the: liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, uterus, ovaries, aorta, IVC, thyroid, infant brains, infant hips, infant spines and pylorus, and veins and arteries. The real time imaging obtained can also be used to guide procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspirations.

Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation, thus making it a safe alternative to x-ray or CT exams.

Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

At St. Bernards Medical Center we utilize the most sophisticated technology available. We currently have a 1.5 Tesla Siemens Espree which is known as “the open magnet” allowing our patients to feel much more comfortable and less confined. The diameter of the bore is much like a CT scanner in size and also has a short bore instead of a longer enclosed one. Due to this technology, we are able to perform several diagnostic studies on larger patients or patients that are claustrophobic.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a test that utilizes magnetic fields and pulses of radio wave energy to produce images of organs and structures inside the body. MRI gives the best soft tissue contrast of all the imaging modalities.

MRI has great benefit in imaging of the brain, spine, and musculoskeletal system. An MRI scan can be used to image aneurysms, strokes, blood vessel disease, bone tumors, torn ligaments or tendons, spinal conditions; just to name a few.

This modality is currently contraindicated for patients with pacemakers, cochlear implants, some indwelling medication pumps, certain types of cerebral aneurysm clips, metal fragments in the eyes and some metallic hardware due to the powerful magnetic fields and strong fluctuating radio signals the body is exposed to.

It may also be performed to provide more detailed information about conditions found in other imaging modalities such as X-ray, ultrasound, or CT.  Contrast material may be used during MRI to show abnormal tissue more clearly.

MRI is an extremely valuable tool in the medical field.

Computed Tomography (CT)

Here at St. Bernards we have 2 Multi-slice CT scanners. One is a 256 slice scanner that can scan body parts in 5-10 seconds. It also has the capability of scanning the heart, which is a more recently developed technology. The second is a large bore 16 slice scanner that is capable of accommodating patients who are larger or claustrophobic. It also has fluoroscopic capabilities that allow us to do minimally invasive procedures quicker and lets the radiologist see what he is doing while he is doing it.   

Computed Tomography (CT) is an imaging modality that uses specialized X-ray equipment to create detailed slices or “images” of anatomy and diseases processes.

CT is used to help diagnose a broad range of disease processes and/or injuries, which include the entire body: the skeletal system, soft tissues, organs and blood vessels. Diagnosis includes emergent conditions such as cerebral hemorrhage (brain bleed), pulmonary embolus (blood clot in the lung), aortic dissection, appendicitis, kidney stones, traumatic injuries, cancers, and tumors.

Many CT exams require the use of IV contrast which helps to better evaluate organs and blood vessels. CT exams of the abdomen and pelvis may also require the use of oral contrast that helps to better evaluate the stomach and intestines.

Interventional CT studies are very useful because they allow an Interventional Radiologist to guide needles into position for the purpose of biopsying an abnormal mass or growth or to guide a tube into place for the sampling or drainage of abnormal fluid or air collection in the body.

With the ability to perform so many vital medical examinations CT imaging is rapidly growing and widely used in medical evaluation and treatment. With its large scope of use in medicine today and in the future, CT imaging is a service St. Bernards is proud to offer its patients.

Interventional Radiology

Special Procedures or Interventional Radiology is a growing subspecialty in which both vascular and nonvascular diseases are diagnosed and treated. It is a minimally invasive technique that utilizes small catheters, catheter-based instruments and multiple types of guide wires etc. These procedures are performed with local or intravenous sedation and are guided by radiological imaging such as fluoroscopy, CT, ultrasound, or a combination.

Special Procedures offers an alternative to conventional medical surgical treatment. The procedures pose less risk to patients and typically decrease hospitalization time.

Just a few of the Interventional Radiology services we provide include:

Diagnostic Angiography and Venography
Dialysis Graft Interventions
Venous Access Services (Dialysis Catheters, Port Placement, etc)
Biliary Drainage/Interventions
Biopsy and Drainages
Uterine Fibroid Embolization
Kyphoplasty
DVT (Thrombolysis, IVC, Filter)

All procedures are performed using a team approach:  Interventional Radiologists, Radiologic Technologist, and Registered Nurses.

PET-CT

PET(Positron Emission Tomography) and CT (Computed Tomography) are both standard imaging tools that physicians use to pinpoint disease states in the body. Particularly useful in cancer, a CT scan identifies a suspected tumor, while the PET scan confirms if the tumor is malignant and if it has spread. By combining these two technologies, physicians can more accurately diagnose and identify cancer and other diseases.

Imaging Center: (870) 207-8000

Diagnostic X-Ray

Two forms of radiographic images are in use in diagnostic x-ray: routine x-rays and fluoroscopy.

Routine x-rays are often used to determine the type and extent of a fracture as well as to detect pathologies. Routine x-rays are usually performed in the radiology department, but patients can also be imaged in their hospital rooms. If the patients’ condition deems them too ill to come to the radiology department some imaging can be performed using mobile units. The same is true for traumatic injury patients who are brought to the Emergency Room.  Mobile x-ray units are used to assist in making rapid diagnoses that allows for the best possible outcome for the patient.

Another facet of diagnostic x-ray is fluoroscopy that produces real-time images of internal structures of the body in a fashion similar to radiography. Contrast media, such as barium, iodine, and air are used to visualize internal organs. Fluoroscopy procedures include, but are not limited to: Lumbar Punctures, Spinal Myelograms, Arthrograms, imaging of the Digestive, Urinary, Vascular, and Reproductive Systems.

Diagnostic x-ray is also used in many surgical procedures. Radiographic C-arms produce images to assist surgeons during repairs or interventional procedures that take place in St. Bernards’ OR suites.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound is a safe and generally painless modality that uses sound waves to produce images of the inside of the body. Ultrasound imaging involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin to exam many of the body’s internal organs, including but not limited to the: liver, gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, uterus, ovaries, aorta, IVC, thyroid, infant brains, infant hips, infant spines and pylorus, and veins and arteries. The real time imaging obtained can also be used to guide procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspirations.

Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation, thus making it a safe alternative to x-ray or CT exams.

Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

At St. Bernards Medical Center we utilize the most sophisticated technology available. We currently have a 1.5 Tesla Siemens Espree which is known as “the open magnet” allowing our patients to feel much more comfortable and less confined. The diameter of the bore is much like a CT scanner in size and also has a short bore instead of a longer enclosed one. Due to this technology, we are able to perform several diagnostic studies on larger patients or patients that are claustrophobic.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a test that utilizes magnetic fields and pulses of radio wave energy to produce images of organs and structures inside the body. MRI gives the best soft tissue contrast of all the imaging modalities.

MRI has great benefit in imaging of the brain, spine, and musculoskeletal system. An MRI scan can be used to image aneurysms, strokes, blood vessel disease, bone tumors, torn ligaments or tendons, spinal conditions; just to name a few.

This modality is currently contraindicated for patients with pacemakers, cochlear implants, some indwelling medication pumps, certain types of cerebral aneurysm clips, metal fragments in the eyes and some metallic hardware due to the powerful magnetic fields and strong fluctuating radio signals the body is exposed to.

It may also be performed to provide more detailed information about conditions found in other imaging modalities such as X-ray, ultrasound, or CT.  Contrast material may be used during MRI to show abnormal tissue more clearly.

MRI is an extremely valuable tool in the medical field.

Computed Tomography (CT)

Here at St. Bernards we have 2 Multi-slice CT scanners. One is a 256 slice scanner that can scan body parts in 5-10 seconds. It also has the capability of scanning the heart, which is a more recently developed technology. The second is a large bore 16 slice scanner that is capable of accommodating patients who are larger or claustrophobic. It also has fluoroscopic capabilities that allow us to do minimally invasive procedures quicker and lets the radiologist see what he is doing while he is doing it.   

Computed Tomography (CT) is an imaging modality that uses specialized X-ray equipment to create detailed slices or “images” of anatomy and diseases processes.

CT is used to help diagnose a broad range of disease processes and/or injuries, which include the entire body: the skeletal system, soft tissues, organs and blood vessels. Diagnosis includes emergent conditions such as cerebral hemorrhage (brain bleed), pulmonary embolus (blood clot in the lung), aortic dissection, appendicitis, kidney stones, traumatic injuries, cancers, and tumors.

Many CT exams require the use of IV contrast which helps to better evaluate organs and blood vessels. CT exams of the abdomen and pelvis may also require the use of oral contrast that helps to better evaluate the stomach and intestines.

Interventional CT studies are very useful because they allow an Interventional Radiologist to guide needles into position for the purpose of biopsying an abnormal mass or growth or to guide a tube into place for the sampling or drainage of abnormal fluid or air collection in the body.

With the ability to perform so many vital medical examinations CT imaging is rapidly growing and widely used in medical evaluation and treatment. With its large scope of use in medicine today and in the future, CT imaging is a service St. Bernards is proud to offer its patients.

Women's Radiology Imaging Services

The St. Bernards Outpatient Imaging Center offers the latest technology in the most convenient way possible. As the most advanced imaging facility in the region, we provide entirely digital imaging services and even have a wing dedicated to women’s radiology services in order to provide more privacy and specialized care during testing and exams.

Located on the Matthews Medical Mile, the St. Bernards Imaging Center has a central location and a large parking lot allowing our patients plenty of room and convenience.

1144 E. Matthews
Monday—Friday, 7 a.m.—7 p.m.
870-207-8000

Full-Field Digital Mammography
An annual mammogram is one of the most important exams for women age 40 and older. At St. Bernards, we offer full-field digital mammography that produces superior images so our radiologists have the ability to zoom in and look closely at areas of special interest.

Three digital mammography units are located in the Imaging Center, which allows us to speed up the length of time it takes to schedule breast imaging services. Plus, a fourth unit is located in the St. Bernard’s Mobile Women’s Health Unit (a large pink RV-type van) that travels to various clinics, industry work sites and public events to provide breast care to those who may not have easy access to such services.

Magnetic Resonance Breast Imaging
St. Bernards is the first in the area to offer this supplemental tool to mammography. Bilateral enhanced breast MRI is used to investigate breast concerns detected with a mammogram or other imaging services. It’s also useful for staging breast cancer, determining appropriate treatments and follow-up after treatment.

Stereotactic Biopsy System
This technology allows for a needle biopsy of lesions that previously required surgery, which shortens procedure time and can sometimes provide a preliminary answer on the same day.

Ultrasound
Our dedicated team of registered technologists specializes in breast, abdomen, pelvic, thyroid, obstetrics and vascular studies. Ultrasound assisted procedures at the Imaging Center include breast core biopsy, breast mammotome biopsy, breast needle localization, thyroid biopsy, and cyst aspiration.

Mobile Women’s Health Unit
The Mobile Women’s Health Unit travels to facilities and areas in which women may not otherwise have the opportunity to partake of prevention services, such as mammography. An education coordinator travels with the unit, providing education to facilities visited in the areas of health.

Breast Health Navigator
At St. Bernards, no woman ever has to face breast cancer alone. The Imaging Center provides the region’s only breast health navigator—a registered nurse practitioner with breast health specialist certification—who assists patients with one-on-one care from screening through diagnosis, treatment and recovery.

Staff

At the Imaging Center, we employee dedicated Registered Radiologic Technologists. These technologists offer excellent customer service and are often praised in our patient satisfaction surveys. They also maintain their accreditation with 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years thus insuring that they are up to date on exams, technology and patient safety.

If you have any questions about our Radiology services or preps, please contact us at 870-207-8000.

St. Bernards at Manila

For your convenience, we now off diagnostic x-rays at 3644 N Arkansas Highway 18 in Manila. We are open Monday – Friday from 8:00am to 4:30pm. If you have any questions about our Radiology services, please contact us at 870-570-0194.